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Chandelier Problem Solved!

July 24, 2009

As you can see in the post below, I was looking for ideas on how to make chic and cheap (my two favorite words these days) chandeliers to hang off of trees for the wedding. Lulu once again has come to the rescue!

Now, who wants to help me make these? How hard do you think this will be? I don’t quite understand how he makes the curved cuts so smoothly by hand. Hmmm.

Instead of the cut out candles, I thought we would replace them with these:

bevfabriccrafts_2064_276143303

I’m sure you can get them dirt cheap. The ones I found are 6 candles for $5 here but we might be able to find them cheaper somewhere else.

Images and text below thanks to Craftstylist and Jeffery Rudell! Click on that link to read the full article—it’s pretty interesting!

The finished piece prior to its installation in the holiday windows of Tiffany & Company. Its on view until December 25 at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York City.  Two simple shapes formed the basis for my chandelier. My goal was to come up with a design that looked delicate and ornate but would hold up beneath the hot lights of a window display. Strategic cross-grain creasing added great stability to my project. As well, I sistered together two of each shape to further enhance the strength of the piece. 

The finished piece prior to its installation in the holiday windows of Tiffany & Company. It’s on view until December 25 at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York City.

Jeff Rudell

Two simple shapes formed the basis for my chandelier. My goal was to come up with a design that looked delicate and ornate but would hold up beneath the hot lights of a window display.

Jeff Rudell

Strategic cross-grain creasing added great stability to my project. As well, I sistered together two of each shape to further enhance the strength of the piece.

Jeff Rudell
The finished piece prior to its installation in the holiday windows of Tiffany & Company. Its on view until December 25 at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York City. 
The finished piece prior to its installation in the holiday windows of Tiffany & Company. It’s on view until December 25 at Fifth Avenue and 57th Street in New York City.

Photo: Jeff Rudell

These are my templates for the two structural components of my chandelier. I cut 12 of each shape and then paired them up: two stemmed arms attached to each other with paper struts, alternating with two stemless arms attached to each other with paper struts.
The first 12 stemless components. Hand-cutting these items took longer than expected but, given the budget, die-cutting was not a viable option.
These components formed the underlying structure of my project. I cut 12 of these profiles and glued them together in pairs.
A detail of the assembly as it began to come together. The two scroll pieces are separated by a small paper strut. The armless pieces, folded in half and attached one to another, form the fluted shape between each of the six arms.
Each candle consisted of three flame shapes and three “candle” shapes glued together to make a 3-D object. A small tab at the bottom of each flame allowed it to be sandwiched between the pieces of the “candle” during gluing.
For the candle shoes, I affixed a small ringlet of paper to a white paper disk using hot glue. Once the glue was dry, each candle was then slid into the candle shoe.
For the crystal garlands that hang between each arm of the chandelier and for the three strands of crystals that hang from each of the six upper candle shoes, I cut disks in two sizes: 1 inch and 5/8 inch. As with the candles, each shape consists of three pieces glued together to form a 3-D object.
White dental floss proved an ideal material to glue my crystals to. As is visible here, each crystal is made of two white disks and one silver metallic disk. The resulting crystals have just a hint of glimmer to them, further enhancing the notion that they are reflective baubles.
A detail of a candle shoe with three strands of crystals attached, mounted on the scroll base.
Because the candles were not glued into the candle shoes, I was able to move and position each candle to point straight up.
For the crystal garlands that hung between the arms of the lower rung of candles, I alternated large circles with small circles. This gave a little visual heft to the lower portion of the chandelier and added a slightly whimsical sense to the piece.
A large bauble, made of ten 3-inch disks, made a beautiful pendant ornament for the bottom of my piece.
The finished piece prior to its installation. Not a droopy candle or limp-looking scroll to be found.
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4 Comments leave one →
  1. July 25, 2009 8:32 pm

    i will help… and will be AWESOME if you let me keep one of them after your wedding…they are PREEEEETTTTTY!!!! show the site to my mom…and she lOVES it too =]

  2. amychien permalink*
    July 25, 2009 9:24 pm

    Yay!! Of course you can keep one!

  3. August 4, 2009 7:39 pm

    Whoa this project looks really…intimidating!

  4. amychien permalink*
    August 6, 2009 3:03 pm

    Good thing I will have Lulu and Liang’s magic fingers to help me!

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